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View Full Version : 5 Creepy Ways Video Games Are Trying to Get You Addicted


TroldePus
08-03-2010, 06:15 PM
http://www.cracked.com/article_18461_5-creepy-ways-video-games-are-trying-to-get-you-addicted.html


Taken from the above link:



If you've ever been addicted to a game or known someone who was, this article is really freaking disturbing (http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/3085/behavioral_game_design.php?page=1). It's written by a games researcher at Microsoft (http://www.gamasutra.com/view/authors/54/John_Hopson.php) on how to make video games that hook players, whether they like it or not. He has a doctorate in behavioral and brain sciences. Quote:
"Each contingency is an arrangement of time, activity, and reward, and there are an infinite number of ways these elements can be combined to produce the pattern of activity you want from your players."
Notice his article does not contain the words "fun" or "enjoyment." That's not his field. Instead it's "the pattern of activity you want."
http://cdn-www.cracked.com/phpimages/article/8/3/7/19837.jpg?v=1
"...at this point, younger gamers will raise their arms above their head, leaving them vulnerable."


His theories are based around the work of BF Skinner, who discovered you could control behavior by training subjects with simple stimulus and reward. He invented the "Skinner Box," a cage containing a small animal that, for instance, presses a lever to get food pellets. Now, I'm not saying this guy at Microsoft sees gamers as a bunch of rats in a Skinner box. I'm just saying that he illustrates his theory of game design using pictures of rats in a Skinner box.
http://cdn-www.cracked.com/phpimages/article/8/3/8/19838.jpg?v=1
This sort of thing caused games researcher Nick Yee to once call Everquest a "Virtual Skinner Box." (http://www.nickyee.com/eqt/skinner.html)

(http://www.nickyee.com/eqt/skinner.html)
So What's The Problem?
Gaming has changed. It used to be that once they sold us a $50 game, they didn't particularly care how long we played. The big thing was making sure we liked it enough to buy the next one. But the industry is moving toward subscription-based games like MMO's that need the subject to keep playing--and paying--until the sun goes supernova.
http://cdn-www.cracked.com/phpimages/article/8/3/9/19839.jpg?v=1
Now, there's no way they can create enough exploration or story to keep you playing for thousands of hours, so they had to change the mechanics of the game (http://serialganker.blogspot.com/2008/09/ethics-of-mmo-addiction.html), so players would instead keep doing the same actions over and over and over, whether they liked it or not. So game developers turned to Skinner's techniques.
This is a big source of controversy in the world of game design right now. Braid creator Jonathan Blow said Skinnerian game mechanics are a form of "exploitation." (http://www.smh.com.au/news/articles/ethical-dilemmas/2007/09/19/1189881577195.html) It's not that these games can't be fun. But they're designed to keep gamers subscribing during the periods when it's not fun, locking them into a repetitive slog using Skinner's manipulative system of carefully scheduled rewards.
Why would this work, when the "rewards" are just digital objects that don't actually exist? Well...


...... and....



This is why some writers blasted Blizzard (http://serialganker.blogspot.com/2008/08/achievements-in-wow-patch-30-blatantly.html) when WoW introduced a new "achievement" system a couple of years ago. These are rewards tied to performing random pointless tasks, over and over again (such as, fishing until you catch a thousand fish). No new content, no element of practice, or discovery, or mastery was included. Just a virtual treadmill.
Of course, game developers (and various commenters, I'm sure) would correctly point out that nobody is making the players do it. Why would humans voluntarily put themselves in laboratory hamster mode?

.....and....

The danger lies in the fact that these games have become so incredibly efficient at delivering the sense of accomplishment that people used to get from their education or career. We're not saying gaming will ruin the world, or that gaming addiction will be a scourge on youth the way crack ruined the inner cities in the 90s. But we may wind up with a generation of dudes working at Starbucks when they had the brains and talent for so much more. They're dissatisfied with their lives because they wasted their 20s playing video games, and will escape their dissatisfaction by playing more video games. Rinse, repeat.
And let's face it; if you think WoW is addictive, wait until you see the games they're making 10 years from now. They're only getting better at what they do.

dantheman
08-03-2010, 08:25 PM
I love Cracked. My daily source of amusement :)